Foreign Coins
 
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Coin Lingo information on Rare Coins
 
jump ahead by clicking a letter from the alphabet
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 
 
G
Garrett
Short for the Garrett family. The two main collectors, Thomas H. Garrett and John W. Garrett, formed this extensive collection from the late 1800s through the early 1900s. Later, it was given to Johns Hopkins University and was sold in five auction sales. This provenance on a numismatic item is as coveted as an Eliasberg pedigree.
Gem
Adjectival description applied to Mint State and Proof-65 coins. It also is used for higher grades and as a generic term for a superb coin.
Gobrecht
Short for “Gobrecht dollar.”
Gobrecht dollar
The silver dollars dated 1836, 1838, and 1839 struck in those years and restruck later (some 1836-dated coins were struck in 1837). These are named for their designer, Christian Gobrecht, Chief Engraver from 1840 to 1844 but defacto engraver when William Kneass suffered his stroke in 1835.
gold
Obviously, the precious metal. Also, slang for any United States gold issues.
gold commem
Short for gold commemorative.
gold commemorative
Any of the eleven commemorate coins struck in gold from 1903 until 1925. Also, any of the modern United States commemorative gold issues, sometimes called modern gold commems.
gold dollar
The small coins of one dollar denomination struck from 1849 until 1889.
grading
The process of numerically quantifying the condition of a coin. Before the adoption of the Sheldon numerical system, coins were given descriptive grades such as Good, Very Good, Fine, and so forth.
Greysheet
Slang for Coin Dealer Newsletter.
 
 
 
 
Helpful Tips when viewing Coin Images...
The image, or "scan", of a rare coin should only be used as a reference point, rather than a final decision maker when purchasing rare coins. "No" digital image or scan will ever do true justice to the natural beauty of a coin. A digital camera or scanner, at this stage of technology, can never reproduce the way a human eye views an object. As you move a coin in the light, the surfaces change appearance depending on the angle at which the light source is hitting the coin. This effect is most obvious with very deep, proof coins. In person this "mirrored" effect is quite dramatic as you move the coin around. A two dimensional digital image loses this reflective nature of a coin, not being able to depict the mirrored qualities that your eye is able to perceive. Keep in mind that nothing can compare to examining a coin in person.
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At Albanese Rare Coins we strive to achieve the highest quality images in order to assist you with a purchasing decision; considering the balance between download times and image quality. As always, you can be confident when purchasing rare coins from us, as we "hand select" every coin for its true beauty and eye appeal.
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