Foreign Coins
 
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Coin Lingo information on Rare Coins
 
jump ahead by clicking a letter from the alphabet
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 
 
V

V-nickel
Common name for the Liberty Head five-cent coins struck from 1883 through 1912. (The 1913 was struck clandestinely and is not listed in Mint reports.)
Variety
A coin of the same date and basic design as another but with slight differences. PCGS recognizes all major varieties while there are thousands of minor varieties, most of which have significance only to specialists of the particular series. After hubbed dies, introduced in the 1840s, varieties are mainly variations in date and mintmark size and placement.
VDB
Short for 1909 VDB Lincoln Head cent. Controversy arose over having a non-Mint engraver’s initials on a coin, so Victor D. Brenner’s initials were removed. This was likely a jealous complaint from the Chief Engraver Charles Barber as the tiny B on the Barber series had generated no outcry. This is a similar situation to the complaint lodged, again probably by the Chief Engraver of the time William Kneass, against the name-below-base Gobrecht dollars. This overt signing was moved to a less obvious position on the base of the rock of the Gobrecht dollar while, in 1918, the VDB was returned to the Lincoln Head cent albeit in a less conspicuous place on the slanted area at the bottom of Lincoln’s shoulder.
 
 
 
 
Helpful Tips when viewing Coin Images...
The image, or "scan", of a rare coin should only be used as a reference point, rather than a final decision maker when purchasing rare coins. "No" digital image or scan will ever do true justice to the natural beauty of a coin. A digital camera or scanner, at this stage of technology, can never reproduce the way a human eye views an object. As you move a coin in the light, the surfaces change appearance depending on the angle at which the light source is hitting the coin. This effect is most obvious with very deep, proof coins. In person this "mirrored" effect is quite dramatic as you move the coin around. A two dimensional digital image loses this reflective nature of a coin, not being able to depict the mirrored qualities that your eye is able to perceive. Keep in mind that nothing can compare to examining a coin in person.
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At Albanese Rare Coins we strive to achieve the highest quality images in order to assist you with a purchasing decision; considering the balance between download times and image quality. As always, you can be confident when purchasing rare coins from us, as we "hand select" every coin for its true beauty and eye appeal.
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